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The Healing Power of Music

The Healing Power of Music

by Rephethile Kgwale                              Posted: 2022/09/02

Music plays a much more significant role than just entertainment, it's therapy. https://bit.ly/3QcFYj4

Utilizing music's potent therapeutic properties, music therapy helps people feel better. It serves as an alternative to other therapeutic approaches like counseling or CBT (The responses and connections, which a person has to music, used by therapists to promote mood and general mental state improvements.) Music therapy may involve both listening to music and making music with various instruments. Additionally, singing or dancing to music may be involved as part of the therapy.

It can help with concentration and attention problems as well as with confidence, independence, and communication skills. Music therapy involves a patient and their therapist engaging in live musical interaction. Music therapy may also heavily incorporate improvisation. This entails improvising music in response to a mood or a theme, such as simulating a storm with drums and a rain stick.
The effects of music on the brain are extremely complex. Various parts of the brain process each component of music, including pitch, tempo, and melody. For instance, the frontal lobes decode the emotional signals produced by the music, the cerebellum handles rhythm, and a small portion of the right temporal lobe aids in pitch understanding. When exposed to powerful music, the nucleus accumbent, the brain's reward center, can even cause strong physical signs of pleasure, such as goosebumps.

These profound bodily responses to music that people have can be used in music therapy to support those who are dealing with mental health issues. Since music therapy does not rely on verbal communication, it may be more beneficial for those who find it difficult to express themselves verbally. This might be the result of a mental health condition, an acquired brain injury, a disability, or a neurodegenerative disease like dementia. Counseling and CBT are both talking therapies, so they might not be appropriate for those who have trouble communicating verbally. This is a situation where music therapy may be useful.


In addition, if a person is unable to leave their bed or travel to a therapist's office, mental health professionals can bring music therapy right to them. Children who desire a familiar setting for their sessions with the therapist can also benefit from receiving music therapy at home. Although many other forms of psychotherapy can be conducted in the home, this is not unique to music therapy.

The abilities one develops in music therapy can be applied in daily life. They may even decide to learn an instrument as a new hobby, which they can use as a means of enhancing their mental well-being and managing challenging circumstances all through their lives. Listening to or making music has additional advantages that talking therapies might not be able to provide. Learning and practicing a piece of music, for instance, can enhance one's memory, coordination, reading, comprehension, and math skills while also teaching responsibility and perseverance. People can feel extremely proud of themselves for producing a piece of music, which can lift their spirits and boost their self-confidence.
People can learn about many diverse cultures through music therapy because it allows clients to experiment with any style or genre of music. People can better relate to the music they are hearing or playing if they are aware of its background.

Although talking therapy includes self-expression, people can express themselves more creatively through music therapy, which can be a more enjoyable way to work through challenging emotions.

Music plays a much more significant role than just entertainment, it's therapy. https://bit.ly/3QcFYj4

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